MM 053 – Demand Generation for Manufacturers

Demand Generation for Manufacturers

Guest: Carlos Hidalgo, CEO and Principal at Annuitas 

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Highlights:

  • Carlos’ book, Driving Demand demand generation
  • Carlos shares an excellent definition of ‘demand generation’ as a perpetual process. He says “demand generation is a marketing and sales function it’s not just a marketing function.” [3:00]
  • Nobody likes to be disrupted or interrupted, a good demand generation function is always working by offering content that is helpful and useful, ready and available with a prospective customer is ready to engage. [6:20]

  • First step – understand the buyer, then ask how marketing and sales fit into that picture. [8:10]
  • Annuitas advises clients to share helpful resources and to go even further to not use heavy branding with those resources that are offered on a perpetual basis. [10:30]
  • Demand generation can be a huge competitive advantage when it is done right. It helps with retention and upsell too. [12:20]
  • Demand generation works for ‘new logo’ revenue, ‘retention revenue’ and ‘upsell revenue’. [13:30]
  • “The culture of ‘hey marketing, sales is your customer’ has to go away. The customer is your customer”. [16:50]
  • Manufacturing companies that are unwilling or unable to adapt to knowledge marketing and meeting the buyer with useful information, may not survive. [19:20]
  • Carlos shares a success story about Lennox Tools a division of Rubbermaid where marketing contribution to pipeline grew by 10%. [22:00]

Interview Questions:

Question 1 –  Carlos, I think it’s important to level set here before we get into the discussion.  What is “demand generation” and why is it so important in this modern age of digital marketing and online buying behavior?

Question 2 – Would you share a practical example or the pieces of a demand generation process and strategy – just a high level view showing what it looks like.

Question 3 –  What else does or can demand generation do for a manufacturing business?  Positioning, competitive advantage, perception, etc.?

Question 4 – Many of our listeners are manufacturers who have a very lean marketing function. Typically, the marketing function reacts to the demands of the sales and product teams; creates spec sheets, set up trade shows, upload new website content, etc. It seems like it would be difficult to employ a demand generation strategy without increasing the marketing resources.  Is that the case or are there other ways a manufacturer could employ demand generation, i.e. outsourcing?

Question 5 – What about ROI, what is your experience about the return on the investment of talent, technology, opportunity cost, etc. when it comes to the return on investing in demand generation?  Do you have a practical example/success story of a B2B manufacturing company you could share?

 Challenge Question –  This week our challenge question comes from a VP Sales and Marketing at a manufacturer of weather measurement equipment. “As a VP of sales and marketing, I’m in charge of the entire go-to-market team.  We operate in the traditional way with a direct field sales team supported by a marketing team of 15. My background is 100% sales. Lately, there is some tension between the sales team and the marketing team. Marketing wants to generate content that is not product focused and Sales wants more product collateral. Marketing keeps talking about “content marketing”. What do you think about this idea of content that doesn’t focus on the product?

  • Focus on buyer informed content first even before getting started with content marketing. The first step is to understand your customer.  It’s not only about product and it’s not only about content, it’s about understanding the buyer.
  • It’s time to align sales and marketing as the revenue team.

Takeaways:

  • Get to know your buyers, how they purchase, their pain points, their challenges before mentioning your product.
  • Understand this is not a short term strategy, it is a culture change in most companies. It is fundamental change management that must come from the top.

Bruce:
Welcome to the Manufacturing Marketing Matters, a podcast produced by the Manufacturing Marketing Institute, the center of excellence for manufacturing marketers. I’m Bruce McDuffee, and thank you for listening.

Hello, manufacturing marketers. Before we get started today, I just wanted to remind our audience about the Manufacturing Marketing Alliance. It’s a new mastermind group for manufacturing marketers. So if you like what you hear on the podcast about growing your business when you stop pitching products and start sharing expertise and you want to talk with like-minded manufacturers in a virtual mastermind group with me as your mentor, check it out. It’s mmmatters.com/alliance.

Now, on to our podcast today. Our guest expert today is Carlos Hidalgo. He’s the CEO and principal at ANNUITAS. He’s also the author of a book called Driving Demand. Welcome, Carlos.
Carlos:
Thanks, Bruce. Pleasure to be here and thanks for having me. I’m excited about this opportunity and excited to talk to you.
Bruce:
Yeah, I’m really looking forward to the discussion and I think our audience is too, Carlos.

Folks, Carlos and his company, ANNUITAS, they’re experienced and expert in what’s called demand generation, specifically for B2B or business-to-business companies. Our discussion today is going to be about generating demand, what it means, how it’s achieved, and why it’s an opportunity for manufacturers because, as we talk about, most or many manufacturers are still using a go-to-market strategy straight out of the 1990’s, meaning a direct sales force. We’re good at building relationships one at a time, go to a few or many trade shows, maybe do some social media posting. Very few have a strategy or process in place to actually drive demand or fill that sales pipeline.

Folks, on this edition of the podcast, Carlos will share his experience and expertise, ideas and suggestions about how you can and should be building a modern demand generation machine so you can gain market share and position your company ahead of your competitors. How does that sound, Carlos?
Carlos:
That sounds right on. That sounds right on, so let’s jump into it.
Bruce:
I think the first thing, Carlos, is to level set here and let’s share with the audience what is this term, demand generation. Second part, why is it so important in this modern age of digital marketing and the new online buying behavior.
Carlos:
Bruce, I’m so glad you asked that question because I hear terms thrown around in our B2B industry that are used almost interchangeably. To really define demand generation, we look at it as a perpetual process. When you think about a buying journey that’s ongoing, we want something that’s perpetual. It’s really a process that’s engaged or designed to engage, nurture and convert a buyer according to their buying process. We’re looking to educate the buyer because oftentimes buyers know they have a problem but they don’t really understand or haven’t had time to qualify it or even quantify it. We want to educate them and, at the same time, we want to qualify them as they’re going through that journey. We do this through marketing and sales coming together and collaborating. I think that’s so important to understand that demand generation is a marketing and sales function, it’s not a marketing only function.

Ultimately, the goal for demand generation is to drive revenue and maximize customer lifetime value. I think the reason it’s so important today is, as buyers, if you think about how we buy in our consumer world, very rarely do we walk on a car lot or go to a department store and approach a sales associate and say, “Tell me about this appliance,” or, “Tell me about this car.” We do all of our research online. We type in what we’re looking for.

I use the example of when I bought my car here in Colorado. I typed into Google, “Best all-wheel drive vehicles.” I didn’t type in a brand, I didn’t type in a specific car type. I just wanted education on what’s the difference between four-wheel and all-wheel. Yet for some reason, as sellers, we think because you’re in a B2B environment, you must change the way you approach. In reality, you and I have everything we need in the palm of our hands via our smartphones.

The way people buy today has fundamentally changed, and we’re not just talking to one individual. We’re talking sometimes buying committees that can be up to five to seven people who all have a different view, a different bias, a different challenge they’re trying to solve for. We have to connect with those people in a way that we’ve never had to do it before and they’re in a … Any part of your audience segment is always in a buying process. If we don’t establish an ongoing, perpetual dialogue with them, they will go elsewhere.
Bruce:
Let me see if I get … Summarize it. Demand generation means having a process or strategy in place where your brand and your offering and your content is there to meet somebody who is a prospective customer when they’re out searching for their solution.
Carlos:
That’s exactly right, that’s exactly right. When they’re ready.
Bruce:
When they’re ready, that’s the key, exactly. The old style of pushing products, features and benefits, all the time when nobody is ready, that’s the 1990’s model, right?
Carlos:
It is. Somewhere along the line, somebody used this term of disruptive marketing as a positive thing. I don’t know of anybody in the world who likes disruption. We are just not wired that way as human beings, and so this idea that I’m going to disrupt you with a call or an email and tell you how great I am, okay. I don’t care because I’m not in that stage of a buying process. I may not even be in a buying process, so we now need to conform to the buyers and tell them what they need and listen to them so we can respond appropriately.
Bruce:
Disruption just makes us mad, right?
Carlos:
That’s right, exactly right.
Bruce:
Not a good start. Let’s get down to just a little bit of nuts and bolts, Carlos. Maybe you could share … You can do it either through a practical example or share the pieces and parts of a demand generation processing strategy. Not the whole thing, of course, we don’t have time for that, but like a high level. What is it?
Carlos:
I hear so many times people say, “Well, I’ve got to get my content in order,” and trust me, content is such an important piece. Really, when you think about demand generation from an operational perspective, we have to align our people, so that is sales and marketing, our process, how we’re qualifying, scoring, writing business rules and service level agreements. Our people, process, content, technology and our data, and we have to align all of that around a buyer.

If we miss out, if we don’t really include one of those pillars, we’re not going to be successful in the execution of our demand generation strategy because every piece and component plays off the other. I see so many companies rushing to content or rushing to technology or simply want to define their lead to revenue process, but they’re leaving all those different components out.

When you think about that, it starts with the buyer, understanding their needs, their challenges, their pain points, what are they trying to solve for, how do they search for a purchase, what content do they consume during that process. Then I can say, “All right, marketing and sales, how do we fit into that picture? Should marketing take more of that lead?” I don’t think that’s always the case. We had one client where, when we interviewed their buyers, they say, “I like to talk to a rep within the first or second phone call.”

If we don’t know that though, we can’t construct the proper approach. We can’t use technology the right way, we can’t define a lead qualification model the right way. All of these pieces have to be intertwined and working in unison so we can build that well-oiled perpetual machine.
Bruce:
Interesting. So it’s more than just a marketing automation platform and some content, for example.
Carlos:
Absolutely.
Bruce:
It’s interesting. It’s a whole machine put together.
Carlos:
It is.
Bruce:
Like a car.
Carlos:
Right.
Bruce:
You’ve got to have all the parts for it to run.
Carlos:
Exactly, and I think if you look at most organizations today, even manufacturers, most of them have marketing automation and they’re sure as heck putting out a heck of a lot more content. Are they successful on that? They’re not, but we keep spending more and doing more and expecting different results. As I’ve said before, the definition of that is insanity.
Bruce:
Albert Einstein.
Carlos:
Exactly.
Bruce:
You said a couple of important things in that answer I want to emphasize for our audience. One is, understanding the customer or understanding the target audience. That’s so critical because it’s more than just knowing who they are. It’s really understanding what their challenges are and where you can fit that. Would you agree with that?
Carlos:
Absolutely because that’s going to inform what I write to and how I create content. If I can help you address your problem and educate you on how to address the problem you are trying to solve for, there’s a pretty good chance you’re going to buy from me at the end of the day.
Bruce:
And you do this education without pitching the product, is that right?
Carlos:
Correct and we even promote here in ANNUITAS with our clients that you actually don’t even want really heavily branded pieces. You’re there to be a resource for them to say this person, my company, this product, whoever it is knows where I’m at. They’re not trying to shove their brand down my throat. They’re not trying to do all these things with me. If you look at commercials from Apple, the only time you see the Apple icon is at the very end of the commercial. They’re relating [inaudible 00:10:43] people and they’re saying, “Hey, look at all the cool things that are out there. Oh, by the way, it’s from Apple.”
Bruce:
You have to make the connection though, especially if it’s not a brand like Nike or Apple. At some point, you have to make the connection that, “Hey, we’re helping you. Here’s our useful information. By the way, we’re this company and we do this.” Is that true or are you saying not even to do that?
Carlos:
No, I think you do but that’s the value in building something perpetual versus tactical. If you’re going to do tactical and just send out a few email blasts, of course, it’s like a pilot on a TV series. You have one shot for people to tune in but if it’s perpetual and I’m building a model that aligns to a purchase path. Now, I have the opportunity to build a relationship and I can start with what we call engage stage content to educate, inform, help you gather more information.

As you keep coming back through that nurture stage content, I can start to tie a little bit more of my brand in solution set to some of the problems that you’ve identified for me by the content that you’ve consumed through the process.
Bruce:
Got it. That makes sense. That makes a lot of sense. The main generation, it sounds like we’re saying, “Yes, it can increase sales,” and that’s really the bottom line purpose of it but what else can it do for a manufacturing marketer or company?
Carlos:
I think it’s a huge competitive advantage when organizations do it and do it well. First of all, you provide a great upfront customer experience. When I’m in a buying cycle and I really feel like digital or otherwise, I’m having a back and forth dialogue and discussion with a vendor, that they get me, they understand who I am. Then at the point of sale, I’m having a continuity of conversation from digital to an actual salesperson. That’s a great customer experience, great buying experience.

It also can serve from a retention and a cross-sell and upsell perspective and that’s one of the areas where I see organizations miss so very much where they have a customer who has one’s product and it’s like, “Okay, I told you I loved you when you bought the product. If I ever change my mind, I’ll let you know.” Well, we should be gaining and using these same types of principles to keep that customer and gave that customer further and gain a broader share of their wallet in the spend because if you already have some of my products, why don’t I want you to have other of these products?

I really think it’s, yes, it’s about generating revenue but there’s more than one way to revenue. There’s new logo revenue and then there’s retention revenue as well as cross-sell and upsell revenue. I think I’ve seen when organizations do it and do it well, it truly becomes a competitive advantage for them and their salespeople become more effective and efficient in the process.
Bruce:
Interesting. It goes beyond just getting new customers, it goes to retention, it goes to selling more. I guess, really, what we’re saying here, Carlos, is that by helping people, its prospective customers and existing customers … By helping them to solve their problems and to be better, it goes to reliability and relationship.
Carlos:
Absolutely. [crosstalk 00:14:06] Bruce:
When you have a vendor that’s been reliable, is helping you all the time, a lot of it for free and is building that relationship, of course, you’re going to ask them first. “Well, do you do this? Can you do this too?” It naturally builds it.
Carlos:
It does and I think you just hit on such a key thing there, the whole trust factor. I want to work with vendors and buy from vendors I can trust. That trust is going to be established during that buying process. If all you’re interested is selling me your product, telling me what you want me to hear and not really listening … I had lunch not too long ago with the CMO who was telling me about some of their journey and he said, “We talked to so many customers.” He goes, “And the sales guy wouldn’t shut up.”
Bruce:
We can all relate to that.
Carlos:
Exactly. He said, “The sad part was we were looking for sales consultants to come in and work with our salespeople and they wouldn’t listen to us.” When you hear her, when you feel as a buyer that you’ve been heard, that they get your problem and especially if I can engage with your content or even a salesperson and we can talk about the industry at large from a subject matter expertise, man, now, you get me. You understand where I’m at. Even if you are higher cost, I’m going to buy from you because you’ve won my trust.
Bruce:
Even if you’re a higher cost. Did you hear that, audience? Even if you’re a higher cost, you’re going to be the choice.
Carlos:
I always scratch my head when I hear, “Well, we just got beat on cost.” I’m like, “Really?”
Bruce:
Nobody gets beat on cost.
Carlos:
That’s hard to swallow. It’s very, very rare.
Bruce:
Yeah, it is. That’s true. Even though what they’ll tell you, that’s the biggest excuse out there. “I didn’t buy from you because you were too expensive.” That’s the easy one.
Carlos:
Exactly.
Bruce:
That’s rarely true.
Carlos:
Nobody has the heart to tell the truth. You’re just got flat out sold.
Bruce:
Exactly, and establish value. Carlos, as you know, many of our listeners to the podcast are manufacturers who have a very lean marketing function. Typically, the function, the marketing team reacts to the demands of sales. “I need a brochure. I need a trade show set up. I need a new webpage,” things like that.

It seems like from what we’re talking about and from what I know about demand generation, that it’s hard to do it without increasing the marketing resources. Is that the case or can you do it with a lean team? What’s your thoughts on that?
Carlos:
I’ve seen it done with very lean marketing teams. I think what this boils down to is just leadership and change management. I think first and foremost, the culture of, “Hey, marketing sales is your customer,” has to go away. [crosstalk 00:17:00] Yeah, the customers are my customer. I don’t show up for work everyday as a marketer to go to sales and say, “Place your order and I’ll go fulfill it.” That’s a leadership issue.

I still know of CEOs and CMOs who disagree with me 100% and that’s fine but I think, first of all, it’s changing that culture. Then, secondly, really saying, “Look, the buyers have fundamentally changed. The buying process has changed. We can’t be static in our approach.” How do you do that is the big question. How do you say, “Well, we’re not going to do all those other stuff so we can retool and reprogram and launch a new effort.” You got to keep the lights on while building this other house.

Really, what we always talk about is pick an area of the business where you can pile up this new approach, minimally disruptive, pick a specific audience segment, be laser focused on that and give people the time, the resource of the investment in order for them to be able to do that. You can do that with a lean team and you can still keep the things you’re doing today on but what eventually gets to you is a new model, a new approach. It helps drive change and then the numbers will speak for itself.
Bruce:
Yeah. I love the idea of introducing content marketing or educational knowledge-sharing marketing with a pilot. [crosstalk 00:18:26] I think that’s a great idea because it’s low risk, right? If you go in and talk to your VP or your CEO or whatever and say, “Hey, we’re going to change the way we market.” Never going to get a buy-in.
Carlos:
That’s right.
Bruce:
If you say, “Hey, we’ve got this pilot program. It’s a new concept for marketing. We want to approve the concept. Can I get a little budget or little time to do it?” They’ll probably approve it.
Carlos:
Exactly. Exactly right. I would say if you’re in that role and you keep hearing, no, no, no, no, that may be an indication that you’re in a company that’s not going to be progressive, that doesn’t want to change. It may be time for you as an individual to make that change.
Bruce:
It may be an indication as well that that company is not going to survive.
Carlos:
That’s exactly right. I’ve said that before and people kind of rolled their eyes and I’m like, “If you look at the consumer side 10 years ago, did anybody think Circuit City or Borders Books would be out of business?” These are companies that did not adapt. Blockbuster is another one. These are companies that [crosstalk 00:19:26] did not adapt to a changing buyer and they were empires and now they’re gone.
Bruce:
Yeah. It can happen. It’s happening right now. Manufacturers, if you can be the ones in yours … Manufacturers aren’t doing this, most of them, but if you can be the one to put together a demand generation process and strategy like we’re talking about, you can kill at your space because your competitors aren’t doing it in most cases.
Carlos:
That’s exactly right.
Bruce:
Opportunity. Carlos, what about return on investment? I think we’ve probably been hammering this so far in the podcast but let’s put a bow around it. What’s your experience about the return on investment, putting in talent, technology, opportunity cost even when it comes to investing in demand generation?
Carlos:
There is a cost to it. Anybody who tells you there isn’t, is trying to sell you something. There’s definitely a cost but what we’ve seen is when companies take the right approach and take the steps to make those changes and align to a buyer-centric perspective, we do see ROI and what we’ve been able to do is look at these benchmarks that we have established within our clients and we’re seeing that these guys are killing the best in class benchmarks by a wide sum, some of the improvements through even just sales closure from marketing generated leads at times will go up into the double digits.

When you think about that and you think about, “Holy smokes, what does it mean if I can increase my deal velocity by 10 days? What does it mean if I can have an increase of 7% from marketing generated opportunities? What does that mean to my bottom line and what is that going to do for my sales force?” I’ll tell you what, sales gets really excited about those kind of numbers because they know how hard it is to sell and when I’m actually supplying the ability to do that, I think it’s monumental. It just totally changes the game.
Bruce:
I agree. I’ve seen the same exact thing. Get on it, manufacturers. Carlos, on the same track, do you have a success story you could share, so obviously can be anonymous, a B2B manufacturing company who did what you just described?
Carlos:
Yeah. The one we talked about in the manufacturing sector a lot is Lennox Tools, a division of Rubbermaid. They make basically saw blades for heavy-metal manufacturing. A 100-year-old company and when we started working with them, very committed to what I called the old way of doing marketing and sales and they really understood that, “Hey, we have to come a buyer-centric view of what we’re doing from a marketing perspective.”

At the end of the day, after we started to work with them, we saw that their contribution, the marketing contribution, the sales pipeline grew over 10%. We’re consistently seeing that the leads, the engage to qualify leads are converting at over 11%. You now have an organization in a very established, like I said, a 100-year-old company, who was doing things one way saying, “We have to make this change. We know it’s not going to be easy but we know that the benefits are going to pay back in spades.” They’ve done it and they continue to do it and continue to benefit from it.
Bruce:
In saw blades, wow. Talk about the risk of being perceived as a commodity.
Carlos:
Exactly right.
Bruce:
They really made it work for the perception of a commoditized product. That’s a great story. You can do it too, manufacturers. If you’re making ball bearings or if you’re making something boring like raw steel, you can differentiate with this type of the process. Sometimes, just the process itself, sharing knowledge, sharing expertise, engaging with your target audience, that by itself is a huge differentiator in most cases.
Carlos:
Absolutely.
Bruce:
It’s going to change. In 10 years, all of you guys out there might be doing it, the ones who survive.
Carlos:
That’s right.
Bruce:
Great. That’s great information, Carlos. Thanks. That brings us to the second part of our show here, the challenge question. This week … Folks out there, send in your challenge questions. If you’ve got something that you’re facing, a hurdle or you’re looking for a new way to do something, send the question in here to the show. Send it to my email, bruce@mmmatters.com, or hash tag it on Twitter @fmgmarketing and we’ll post it to our guest expert.

This week our challenge question comes from a VP sales and manufacturing and a manufacturer of weather measurement equipment. Here it is, “As a VIP of sales and marketing, I’m in charge of the entire go-to-market team. We operate in the traditional way with the direct field sales team supported by a marketing team of 15. My background is 100% sales. Lately, there is some tension between the sales team and the marketing team. Marketing wants to generate content that’s not product-focused and sales wants more product collateral. Marketing teams keeps talking about ‘content marketing’. What do you think about this idea of content that doesn’t focus on the product?” Carlos, what would you advice here?
Carlos:
Obviously, as what I just said in the beginning of the podcast, I’m a big fan of content that doesn’t focus on the product but I’m a bigger fan buyer-informed content. What I would say to the individual who submitted the question is has your marketing team gone out and talk to your customers not about why they think your products are great or why they bought from your company but asking them questions, what pushed you into a buying process? What problems were you trying to solve for when you look at this type of product or service? Who was part of that buying committee? What roles did they play in that committee? What kind of content did you consume through your buying process? Where did you start doing the research for your buying process?

If I can have that information, that then informs my early stage engage content, I’m a big fan of that because again, I want to be viewed as a vendor that can be trusted. I want to be the vendor who, when people say, “I’m having this problem,” they go, “Oh, go to ABC company. They’ve got all the answers.” If I don’t have the answers, I’m at least going to know where to find the answers. That’s how I’m going to establish that trust.

I would say to him, “It’s not all about products. It’s not all about feature and functionality. These people are trying to solve problems.” Right to those problems first, establish trust and you will gain the opportunity and you will win the opportunities to then talk to them about your products and services and why they should buy from you. If you do that too early, you’re just going to push them away.
Bruce:
Excellent, excellent answer. I wanted to reemphasize a theme that goes along with this question and you’ve brought it up several times in this podcast, Carlos, and that’s sales and marketing alignment. It’s not all about the sales team or all about the marketing team. Really, there’s no more sales team. There’s no more marketing team. There’s just a revenue team. Until you get that into your head, the parts that go into demand generation, their tension is going to be there forever. It’s that tensions at most manufacturing companies that I’ve ever dealt with, so work on that.

As Carlos said, I love that that you have to understand your target audience before you jump into content because so many companies do just jump into content. They get excited about content marketing and we’re going to make some info graphics and we’re going to make some white papers and do some webinars. Wrong approach. You’re exactly right, Carlos. Know the customer first.
Carlos:
Absolutely, you could stay in the woods all day long and scream and nobody is going to hear you. You’re saying a lot of stuff but nobody is going to hear you and so I think it’s important to gain those buyer insights before you ever start creating one piece of content.
Bruce:
That’s probably the one important tip. If you only take one thing away today folks, that statement is the one. Thanks for that information about the challenge question, Carlos, and that brings us to the final portion of the show, the takeaways. If you could share one or two takeaways, it can be reemphasizing something we talked about or it can be two actionable things going forward. What do you have for our audience?
Carlos:
From an action, I would just echo what I just talked about is get to know your buyers. Again, don’t ask them leading questions about, “Why did you buy from us?” Get to know how they purchase, what they’re looking to solve for, their pain points, their challenges. Get to a place where you can talk to a buyer about issues, challenges, problems in your industry without ever mentioning your product. If you can do that, you’re going to be well on your way to producing demand generation that works.

Number two, understand this is not an overnight journey. This is not a 90-day fix. This is a change management initiative. Sales has to change the approach. Marketing has to change the approach. There’s two fundamentally different roles but you’re all after the same thing and that’s to win the trust and the confidence and ultimately, the sale of the buyer. That is fundamentally changed management and it starts at the top. Leaders have to lead and do it the right way.
Bruce:
Two great takeaways and to sum up for the show, what I would say is for demand generation, yes, it’s a term but it’s as Carlos just said, it’s a culture change. It really is. For most manufacturers, it’s a change in culture, a way from a me-centric, our-product-centric, our-company-centric to how can I really serve my audience. Think about that. Carlos, before we sign off here, is there anything you’d like to share with our audience about yourself or your company or anything in that way?
Carlos:
As a company, this is what we do everyday for our clients. We talk about transforming demand generation and we transform it, start at the people level and really transform the way they think, the way they operate, the way they execute, the way they measure and it works. My book, it really talks about that. That’s really what the book is about, Driving Demand, is the changes we have to make in this crazy world of B2B marketing that we now live in. What does that change look like and how does that impact what we do as marketers.

That book is really a blueprint for people who say, “Hey, I’m on board. I want to do it. I really need the steps on how to do it.” That’s what Driving Demand is. I’d be more than happy for any of you listeners who want to continue the conversation. My email, carloshidalgo@annuitas.com. I have Twitter following @cahidalgo. I love talking about this and love helping people who catch the vision and really say, “I want to make a difference to my company.”
Bruce:
I can tell. I can hear the passion in your voice, the whole podcast. That’s fantastic. Folks, I’ll put a link to Carlos’ book in the show notes so you can click on it and directly check it out and directly buy it. It sounds like a great book. I’m going to buy it, I’ll tell you that. Well, Carlos …
Carlos:
Good to hear.
Bruce:
You bet. Well, Carlos, thank you so much for being a guest on Manufacturing Marketing Matters today and sharing your knowledge and experience and all those great ideas with our manufacturing marketers.
Carlos:
Thanks for having me, Bruce. I really appreciate it.
Bruce:
That was Carlos Hidalgo, CEO and principal at ANNUITAS. For more information about Carlos and ANNUITAS, visit the guest page, see the show notes and I’ll put all the links in and show highlights and there will be a full transcript of the podcast. Just visit mmmatters.com/podcast or even better, subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or Stitcher or SoundCloud or Google Play.

Thanks for listening to Manufacturing Marketing Matters. If you find this podcast helpful and useful, please subscribe at iTunes or stitcher.com. You can download this episode of MM Matters and get the show notes and learn more about the podcasts at mmmatters.com. I’m Bruce McDuffee, now, let’s go out and advance the practice of marketing and manufacturing today.

 

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